How to protect your privacy using Android

We keep an awful lot of personal information on our mobiles these days and, as a direct result, these devices know quite a lot about us. From our location and contacts to our favourite hangouts and hobbies, we happily exchange some of this information for “free” services from the likes of Google and others, but there are plenty of less scrupulous people and businesses out there that would also like to get their hands on this valuable asset.

These days, it makes a lot of sense to look after the data stored on your smartphone and fortunately there are plenty of handy tools available within the Android ecosystem to help keep your data private.

Use the lockscreen

Using a basic PIN, password or swipe gesture really is the bare minimum level of security that everyone should put on their smartphone. As shocking as it might sound, data from a reputable survey in early 2016 suggested that 34 percent of all Android users don’t even make use of the basic lockscreen feature that is built into every Android smartphone. Granted, this may have increased since then, but it still illustrates an important point — not everyone takes security as seriously as they should.

While the talk about malicious software, bugs, and backdoors may often make tech headlines, physical phone theft is still a real issue. If a criminal lacks a conscience enough to steal your phone, they probably won’t have too many qualms about sifting through your contacts, pictures, and emails in an attempt to grab personal data that would be used for further exploitation. There’s a good chance that you’re making use of a banking app on your phone too, and you really wouldn’t want someone to get into those types of important and personal apps.

Enabling a lockscreen PIN is incredibly simple, just head on over to Settings -> Security -> Screen Lock. Here you can pick from your preferred password lock type, which you will then need to enter each time you try to access your phone. Other manufacturers may move this menu to under general settings, if they have their own lockscreen protection alternatives, such as LG’s knock code. And of course, a lot of phones these days give you the ability to log in with other methods like your fingerprint, if passwords aren’t your think.

See full story at www.androidauthority.com

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