How to Install Android Apps on Your Windows Computer, the Easy Way

Apps on Windows have gotten better. But every once in a while, you stumble upon a really useful mobile app that hasn’t made its way to PC yet. If runs on Android, though, there’s good news. With the help of third-party software, you can probably run it on your Windows computer.

Unfortunately, getting apps from your phone or tablet to your PC isn’t as easy as installing a Windows program. To help simplify things, we’ve compiled a comprehensive guide on what software and utilities you need to install Android apps on almost any Windows computer.

Android emulators and how to use them

One way to run Android apps on a Windows computer is by using an Android emulator. Emulators run on complicated code, but the basic gist is this: They enable one computer to behave like another. Android emulators make your Windows machine appear as though it’s an Android device — right down to the processor, cameras, and sensors.

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How to get Android O on your phone right now

Having just shown it off again at I/O 2017, Google has a public beta of the next version update of Android O available for Pixel and Nexus devices.

Google typically announces the Android preview during its Google I/O developer conference held annually in May. In 2017 – for the second year running – the developer preview was made available early so many could test Android O before launch.

A public beta is a “work in progress” build that is released prior to a consumer rollout of the final software. Google offers the beta to collect and incorporate user feedback.

The aim is really to tease out problems with specific devices and allow developers to update apps to support O’s new features or changes, if there are any.

In the initial phases Google is offering Android O for:

So far there’s no mention of any other handsets. Unlike last year, Google hasn’t included any non-Nexus/Pixel phones. Saying that, we wouldn’t rule out seeing another phone or two being included, particularly on the budget end of the scale, to test Android Go, the company’s version of O designed for less powerful, affordable phones.

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See full story at www.pocket-lint.com

 

How to Free Storage Space on Android Phone

Although phones are coming with more and more internal storage these days, running out of it remains a common problem as media files and apps get bigger in size, and thanks to the thousands of pictures we take, not to mention offline music storage. If you’ve ever tried to update your existing apps and ran into an “Insufficient storage available” error, we know how frustrating how that can feel.

The lack of storage space can pretty much bring your phone to a halt. If you try to use the camera, you might see something like “Hey, there is really no room.” It can even prevent you from opening apps (“Internal storage is running out, the application has been stopped.”) or downloading email attachments (“Not enough storage space to sync”).

If you’re looking for some ways to make some room on your Android device, we’ve got some useful tips to help you.

1) Clear cache + data

The easiest and quickest way to gain some free space is to clear the cache and user data associated with apps. You can do this manually for individual apps by going to Settings > Storage > Apps. The exact menu layout might differ depending on your phone manufacturer, but it’ll be fairly similar.

The total size of each app is made up of the core app itself, the user data (logins, files, and settings), and cache (temporary data that helps the app work faster).

For example, an app such as Play Music caches the music you listen to, so it can start playing the tracks quicker next time, and save on data costs. If you clear the app’s cache and data, it will be forced to re-stream the songs next time. Remember that while clearing the cache doesn’t affect the way your app works, clearing user data will reset all settings to default, and possibly even log you out.

Clearing the cache and data is also a temporary fix, as it will build over time again. Some apps offer the option to set cache size, so that they take up less space. On the other hand, you can also clear the cache for all apps at once, if you like. You can find the option in most Android devices under Settings > Storage > Cached data.

2) Clear old downloads

Android has a central Downloads folder where it stores all the files and documents you’ve accumulated from your time on the Internet. This could be images from the Web, zip files from email, or even a video that didn’t support streaming. Over time, these can collect and take up quite a bit of space on your phone.

To look through the downloads gathering dust, find and open the Downloads app. You should be able to sort by size, and figure out the largest nuisances. Hold on any file to select it, and then add to your selection, before hitting the delete icon.

3) Move apps to microSD card

While some manufacturers have phased out microSD card slots for reasons related to design, or to entice you into buying a more expensive variant, if you’re lucky to have the option, you should make full use of it. There are two ways to use microSD cards to move apps. The first is to go into the Apps section in the device settings, and choose the app you’d like to move.

If you’ve got a microSD card installed, and the app can be moved, you should see a Move to SD card option. Note that only part of the app will be moved to external storage, with the decision entirely up to the developers. Sadly, most large games tend to keep most of their data on internal storage for better performance.

See full story at gadgets.ndtv.com

Things You’ve Been Doing That Affects Device Efficiency

An Android device like a smartphone is pretty easy to use. However, with the fewer restrictions and more room for customization, proper Android care seemed to be neglected or left unknown by most users.

Most users would normally commit the mistake of manually killing the apps. They would tend to use third-party task manager apps to stop Android apps manually.

However, such action could undermine the efficiency of your Android device. Devices as such have evolved since its first release. An Android can now automatically feed RAM by killing less priority background apps, according to Deccan Chronicles.

Another grave mistake in dealing with your smartphone is when you use a cleaner to clear cache. It is good to note that cache data are important for proper device app functioning. Without cache data in the system, most apps will load a little bit slower, for the once you have deleted are usually the fastest access for display by apps during launch data.

It is also good to note that another way of caring for your smartphone is by using its reboot option. Not being able to restart your phone once in a while would lead to unwanted files to pile up. The reset option is designed to help your device run smoothly.

Aside from not rebooting the device at least once a week, installing more than one security app could also lower the efficiency of your device. Many threat scanners installed in the device would mean fast battery drain.

By Jacques Strauss

See full story at www.telegiz.com

How to set up speech-to-text in Android

It is never easy, safe or legal to use your phone for typing, talking during certain situations like driving.

In order to help the users with this issue, Android has a feature that writes text messages using Speech-to-text and to our surprise, the voice recognition is accurate. Below are the steps you need to follow in order to use the Speech-to-text feature

Step 1: Open any app, that welcomes keyboard and tap into the field, where you want to write

Step 2: Now tap the Microphone button present on the corner.

Step 3: Once you get “Speak Now”, start dictating the words you need on the message.

Step 4: If you want to insert punctuations, you need to dictate that as well.

Step 5: For Punctuations: Period (.), comma (,), question mark (?), exclamation or exclamation point (!)

Step 6:
For Line spacing: Enter or new line, new paragraph

See full story on www.gizbot.com

Drive smarter and safer with these Android Auto tips

Most of the infotainment systems that come with cars are terrible. Voice recognition feels like it’s from the 1980s, and the navigation scheme would fail most usability tests.

Android Auto was supposed to fix that. Problem is, automakers have been driving in the slow lane when it comes to actually building it into their cars. So Google opted to take matters into its own hands and update Android Auto to operate in a standalone mode that lets you run it on your phone.

Android Auto is quite good, and genuinely improves the in-car experience. If you’re tired of having a dumb car, or just frustrated that your smart vehicle isn’t that brainy, here’s why you should get revved up with Android Auto.

Stay focused

If nothing else, Android Auto does one thing well—reduce potential distractions from using your smartphone while driving. It’s not a light matter, as it’s often way too tempting to glance at your phone or watch to see just who texted you.

The first key to reducing phone distractions is the interface. The Android Auto home screen features Google Now-like cards with the weather and suggested navigation options based on your account information. If you touch one of the destinations it’ll launch navigation to that destination. Or you can swipe it away if it’s no longer relevant. You have to re-tool your thinking slightly from the way stock Android works, but it’s easy to do after a little time with the app.

 

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See full story at www.greenbot.com

Android Care Tips: Things You’ve Been Doing That Affects Device Efficiency

An Android device like a smartphone is pretty easy to use. However, with the fewer restrictions and more room for customization, proper Android care seemed to be neglected or left unknown by most users.

Most users would normally commit the mistake of manually killing the apps. They would tend to use third-party task manager apps to stop Android apps manually.

However, such action could undermine the efficiency of your Android device. Devices as such have evolved since its first release. An Android can now automatically feed RAM by killing less priority background apps, according to Deccan Chronicles.

Another grave mistake in dealing with your smartphone is when you use a cleaner to clear cache. It is good to note that cache data are important for proper device app functioning. Without cache data in the system, most apps will load a little bit slower, for the once you have deleted are usually the fastest access for display by apps during launch data.

It is also good to note that another way of caring for your smartphone is by using its reboot option. Not being able to restart your phone once in a while would lead to unwanted files to pile up. The reset option is designed to help your device run smoothly.

Aside from not rebooting the device at least once a week, installing more than one security app could also lower the efficiency of your device. Many threat scanners installed in the device would mean fast battery drain.

It is good to note that Google has covered virus threats for you. Moreover, installing third party apps, especially the unverified ones, could pose more threat to your device security.
By Jacques Strauss

See full story www.telegiz.com

Drive smarter and safer with these Android Auto tips

Most of the infotainment systems that come with cars are terrible. Voice recognition feels like it’s from the 1980s, and the navigation scheme would fail most usability tests.

Android Auto was supposed to fix that. Problem is, automakers have been driving in the slow lane when it comes to actually building it into their cars. So Google opted to take matters into its own hands and update Android Auto to operate in a standalone mode that lets you run it on your phone.

Android Auto is quite good, and genuinely improves the in-car experience. If you’re tired of having a dumb car, or just frustrated that your smart vehicle isn’t that brainy, here’s why you should get revved up with Android Auto.

Stay focused

If nothing else, Android Auto does one thing well—reduce potential distractions from using your smartphone while driving. It’s not a light matter, as it’s often way too tempting to glance at your phone or watch to see just who texted you.

The first key to reducing phone distractions is the interface. The Android Auto home screen features Google Now-like cards with the weather and suggested navigation options based on your account information. If you touch one of the destinations it’ll launch navigation to that destination. Or you can swipe it away if it’s no longer relevant. You have to re-tool your thinking slightly from the way stock Android works, but it’s easy to do after a little time with the app.

Where Android Auto is most in handy is dealing with messages. When you receive one, Android Auto will read it aloud. It’ll then offer to let you dictate a reply. All of these steps can be handled without actually touching the phone, which is kind of the whole idea behind an infotainment system.

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See full story at www.greenbot.com