Turning Your Android Phone into a Webcam: How To Do It

Have you ever been dissatisfied with the low-quality webcam that your laptop was shipped with? Apart from the very latest laptops, the tiny cameras on notebooks seem almost like an afterthought. Here’s how you can turn your Android phone into a functional webcam…

  • First of all, you need to install an app from the Play store. There are a few apps that can turn your phone into webcam.
  • Set up a user ID and password, which is good for the phone webcam’s privacy and security.
  • At this point, go to your computer and open up your web browser. Browse to the phone webcam’s IP address. Simply type in the complete IP address (with the port) at the address bar and hit enter.

See full story at articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com

This Mod Saves Space by Automatically Clearing Cache on Your Android Apps

Thankfully, Dhi’s new Xposed module will automatically clear cache when your apps reach a certain threshold, meaning you stand to gain some precious storage space by installing this one.

Install Cache Catcher

To get started, head to the Download section in your Xposed Installer app and search for Cache Catcher, then tap the top result. From there, tap the “Download” button in the Versions tab, then press “Install” when prompted. When that’s finished, make sure to activate the module and reboot.

Set Up a Blacklist

When you get back up, go ahead and open the Cache Catcher app. From here, it’s important that you familiarize yourself with the app’s Blacklist section, because you may experience some bugs when Cache Catcher automatically clears cache on certain apps.

Select Max Cache Size

Beyond that, you may also want to change the “Max total size” setting, which is the amount of cached data that non-blacklisted apps will be allowed to keep before Cache Catcher clears it all away. By default, this is set to 8 megabytes, but you might want to choose a larger number if you’re not terribly strapped for storage.

BY

See full story at android.gadgethacks.com

Things You’ve Been Doing That Affects Device Efficiency

An Android device like a smartphone is pretty easy to use. However, with the fewer restrictions and more room for customization, proper Android care seemed to be neglected or left unknown by most users.

Most users would normally commit the mistake of manually killing the apps. They would tend to use third-party task manager apps to stop Android apps manually.

However, such action could undermine the efficiency of your Android device. Devices as such have evolved since its first release. An Android can now automatically feed RAM by killing less priority background apps, according to Deccan Chronicles.

Another grave mistake in dealing with your smartphone is when you use a cleaner to clear cache. It is good to note that cache data are important for proper device app functioning. Without cache data in the system, most apps will load a little bit slower, for the once you have deleted are usually the fastest access for display by apps during launch data.

It is also good to note that another way of caring for your smartphone is by using its reboot option. Not being able to restart your phone once in a while would lead to unwanted files to pile up. The reset option is designed to help your device run smoothly.

Aside from not rebooting the device at least once a week, installing more than one security app could also lower the efficiency of your device. Many threat scanners installed in the device would mean fast battery drain.

By Jacques Strauss

See full story at www.telegiz.com

How to set up speech-to-text in Android

It is never easy, safe or legal to use your phone for typing, talking during certain situations like driving.

In order to help the users with this issue, Android has a feature that writes text messages using Speech-to-text and to our surprise, the voice recognition is accurate. Below are the steps you need to follow in order to use the Speech-to-text feature

Step 1: Open any app, that welcomes keyboard and tap into the field, where you want to write

Step 2: Now tap the Microphone button present on the corner.

Step 3: Once you get “Speak Now”, start dictating the words you need on the message.

Step 4: If you want to insert punctuations, you need to dictate that as well.

Step 5: For Punctuations: Period (.), comma (,), question mark (?), exclamation or exclamation point (!)

Step 6:
For Line spacing: Enter or new line, new paragraph

See full story on www.gizbot.com

AMBER Alerts and Android: What you need to know

Here’s what you need to know about these emergency alerts and how you can control them on your Android phone.

What kind of emergency alerts are there?

There are three (or four, depending on how you’re counting) types of emergency alerts you can receive on your Android. They’re grouped into the less-dangerous-sounding “Cell Broadcast” heading, and include:

  • Extreme threats: Classified as threats to your life and property, like an impending catastrophic weather event like a hurricane or tsunami.
  • Severe threats: Less serious than the extreme threats, these could be the same types of situations, but on a smaller scale — stay safe, but you won’t need to pack up the car and head for the hills.
  • AMBER alerts: These are specific alerts aimed at locating a missing child. Technically AMBER stands for “America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response.” But it was named for Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was kidnapped and killed in 1996. AMBER alerts can appear to be a bit cryptic, giving you the location of the alert, a car license plate number and the make, model, and color of the vehicle.
  • Presidential alerts: These alerts will often fall into the “extreme threats” category, but are issued directly by the President of the United States and cannot be turned off in your phone’s settings.

What does an emergency or AMBER alert sound like?

It’s loud and annoying — particularly if you have a phone with really good speakers, or are with several people who have their phones out.

You’ll likely also find your phone is vibrating when an alert is issued.

BY ANDREW MARTONIK

See full Story at www.androidcentral.com

Amazon FreeTime comes to Android phones and tablets

Amazon’s FreeTime service, which includes access to curated kid-friendly content and various parental controls, is now arriving on Android devices with the launch of a new FreeTime Android app. The app offers parents a similar set of parental controls as those found on Amazon’s Fire tablet devices, as well as a handpicked selection of over 40,000 YouTube videos and websites that have been deemed safe for kids through the FreeTime web browser.

Parents will also be able to upgrade to FreeTime Unlimited for $2.99 per month for an expanded selection of content, if the parent is a Prime member. If not, the price is $4.99 per month – as it is for the Fire tablet version of the service.

This upgraded selection includes over 10,000 age-appropriate books and videos from brands like Disney, Nickelodeon, Amazon Studios, PBS Kids, HarperCollins, Sesame Street, Simon & Schuster, and others.

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See full Story at techcrunch.com

Android Care Tips: Things You’ve Been Doing That Affects Device Efficiency

An Android device like a smartphone is pretty easy to use. However, with the fewer restrictions and more room for customization, proper Android care seemed to be neglected or left unknown by most users.

Most users would normally commit the mistake of manually killing the apps. They would tend to use third-party task manager apps to stop Android apps manually.

However, such action could undermine the efficiency of your Android device. Devices as such have evolved since its first release. An Android can now automatically feed RAM by killing less priority background apps, according to Deccan Chronicles.

Another grave mistake in dealing with your smartphone is when you use a cleaner to clear cache. It is good to note that cache data are important for proper device app functioning. Without cache data in the system, most apps will load a little bit slower, for the once you have deleted are usually the fastest access for display by apps during launch data.

It is also good to note that another way of caring for your smartphone is by using its reboot option. Not being able to restart your phone once in a while would lead to unwanted files to pile up. The reset option is designed to help your device run smoothly.

Aside from not rebooting the device at least once a week, installing more than one security app could also lower the efficiency of your device. Many threat scanners installed in the device would mean fast battery drain.

It is good to note that Google has covered virus threats for you. Moreover, installing third party apps, especially the unverified ones, could pose more threat to your device security.
By Jacques Strauss

See full story www.telegiz.com

Google adds phishing protection to Gmail on Android

Following the widespread phishing scam that affected Google Docs and Gmail users this week, Google says it’s now rolling out a new security feature in its Gmail application on Android that will help warn users about suspicious links. This feature may not have prevented this week’s attack, however, as that attack involved a malicious and fake “Google Docs” app that was hosted on Google’s own domain.

However, the additional security protection is a step in the right direction, given how many users access Gmail on mobile, and the increasing sophistication of these phishing attacks that can even fool fairly tech-savvy individuals.

In this week’s attack, for example, you would have received an email from a known contact who said they were sharing a document with you. When you clicked to open the document, you’d be taken to an innocent-looking web page hosted by Google. The page wouldn’t even prompt you for your password, but instead listed all your Google accounts ready to be clicked.

You would be asked to give an app named “Google Docs” account permissions – but it wasn’t the real Google Docs. And once it had access, the worm began spreading to everyone in your contacts list.

By

See full Story at techcrunch.com