How to move to SD card on Android

Many cheap Android phones come with a paltry 4- or 8GB of storage, while even 16GB isn’t really enough for lots of apps, high-resolution photos and videos, plus a music library. Fortunately, the vast majority of Android phones have a memory card slot, into which you can slot an inexpensive microSD card.

What you need to know about microSD cards

Before you buy one, check what capacity your phone will support. Flagship phones tend to accommodate 128GB or higher, but many cheap Androids accept only 32GB. To be fair, 32GB will be enough for most people. We’ve tested and rated all the best microSD cards.

Once you’ve got the microSD card, it’s easy to set things up so that it becomes the default place for new apps, photos, videos, music and more. You can switch the storage location within your camera settings or Google Play Music settings, for example. But what about the stuff already clogging up your phone’s internal storage?

How to move apps to SD card

First, let’s clear up something important: not all apps can be moved to microSD, and some phones won’t let you move apps to SD at all. This means phones with just 4- or 8GB of internal storage can still run into problems even with a microSD card if you download and use a lot of apps.

Whether or not an app can be moved to microSD is down to the app developer and, sometimes, the phone manufacturer.

Samsung’s Galaxy S7 is among the phones that do allow you to move apps to SD, but you should note that those apps won’t be available when you remove the SD card. We’ve written a separate guide to help if you see Android’s “insufficient storage available” message.

If an app can be moved to the microSD card, you’ll find the option to do so within the Settings, Apps menu. Not all Android phones have the same settings app, but there will be an Apps menu somewhere.

On the first tab of this screen you’ll see all apps downloaded to your phone. Swipe in from the right to see which are stored on your SD card – this screen should be blank unless you did it before and simply forgot how to do it.

To move an app, return to the Downloaded tab and tap on an app to select it. Here we’ve selected AnTuTu, which was not preinstalled on the phone (preinstalled apps often cannot be moved).

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See full story at www.techadvisor.co.uk

Turning Your Android Phone into a Webcam: How To Do It

Have you ever been dissatisfied with the low-quality webcam that your laptop was shipped with? Apart from the very latest laptops, the tiny cameras on notebooks seem almost like an afterthought. Here’s how you can turn your Android phone into a functional webcam…

  • First of all, you need to install an app from the Play store. There are a few apps that can turn your phone into webcam.
  • Set up a user ID and password, which is good for the phone webcam’s privacy and security.
  • At this point, go to your computer and open up your web browser. Browse to the phone webcam’s IP address. Simply type in the complete IP address (with the port) at the address bar and hit enter.

See full story at articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com

12 Tips to Help You Master Gboard for Android

Typing on a mobile device has come a long way since the days of flip phones, when you had to press a key repeatedly to find the right character. Today, there are awesome keyboard apps like Gboard, which integrates Google search features and makes typing a breeze. But the whole experience still stands to improve if you take some time to learn a few useful tips.

Gboard incorporates everything we’ve come to expect from a modern keyboard, including popular features such as emoji support and voice typing. But the true strength this keyboard holds over the competition is the inclusion of handy quick-access functions, such as GIF search, Google Translate, and lots of cool gestures. So below, we’ll cover some of the lesser-known Gboard features.

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See full story at android.gadgethacks.com

7 tips for taking better pictures with Android

For the longest time, anyone needing to take photos to be used for the purpose of marketing, documentation, archival, etc. had to carry with them a Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera to get the best quality photo. That’s not always the case now. With smartphone cameras equally or, in some cases, surpassing the quality of photos taken by DSLR camera, you have everything you need in your pocket to take promo-quality photos.

That quality hardware doesn’t always equate to the best possible picture. And so, I’ve gathered together some of my best tips for taking better photos using the Android platform. Let’s see how many of these will improve your end results.

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See full story at www.techrepublic.com

Android co-founder’s new smartphone confirmed to run Android

The new smartphone from Andy Rubin, which will be the debut product of his new company Essential, will indeed run Android for its operating system. It looked that way from the tiny peek at the corner we got from Rubin’s tweet earlier this week, but now Google’s Eric Schmidt has confirmed it’ll be one of a few “phenomenal new choices for Android users coming very… Read More

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See full Story at techcrunch.com

Pinterest for Android now works with Nougat’s app shortcuts

 

The social collaging app takes advantage of a new feature introduced in Android 7.1.

blankAs Android users, we can appreciate when an app maker attempts to take advantage of some of Android native abilities. The app action shortcuts introduced in Android 7.1, for instance, are a worthy feature to add to marquee apps. Pinterest has certainly caught on.

The latest update to the Android app adds the aforementioned app action shortcuts. You can tap and hold on an icon from the Home screen for quick access to many oft-used tasks. There’s even a shortcut for the new Lens feature, which uses your camera to find pins relevant to what you’re seeing in real life. If you start to see you’re using one particular feature more often than the others, you can drag it down and out to sequester it into its own shortcut icon.

By  FLORENCE ION

See full Story at www.androidcentral.com

Android plans to improve security update speed this year

Google has spent the past year working with third-party manufacturers and phone carriers to improve its update system for Android, which is often criticized for not being fast enough to protect users from known vulnerabilities. And while Google says it has made some progress in this area, about half of Android users still aren’t receiving important security patches. Read More

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See full Story at techcrunch.com

First look at Omron Evolv: Smart blood pressure tracking on Android

Second in a series of how Phil is trying to not die of high blood pressure after years and years of running Android Central. (And doing other unhealthy things.)

OK, OK. Health tech isn’t maybe quite as sexy as the news SmartWatchWear 5000. But I’d argue that maybe it’s just a little more important in the long run, right? Thus my first look at the Withings wireless blood pressure cuff. Syncs to your phone. Syncs to the cloud. Keeps Phil alive. Good times.

But that’s not the only thing like that out there. Just a month ago at CES Omron announced a new kind of cuff that’s smart — it syncs with an app on your phone, yeah — but also standalone. You can use it along with your phone, but you don’t have to. (And as I’m getting older the real definition of a “smart” product is one that recognizes that there are times I don’t want to have to deal with any more tech than is absolutely necessary. But get off my lawn.)

By: PHIL NICKINSON

See full Story at www.androidcentral.com